Their Needs

Poverty is statistically linked to illness and poor health.

According to the World Health Organization approximately 1.2 billion people in the world live in extreme poverty (less than one dollar per day).

The poor in the countries where we serve do not have access to the basic necessities of life, especially safe drinking water. They lack essential utilities such as sanitation, plumbing, toilet facilities, or live in homes with dirt floors. These, along with less access to healthcare and education, lead to a higher risk of illness and disability that perpetuates the cycle of poverty. 

Every day in impoverished villages:

  • Children die from infections that can be treated and prevented
  • Expectant mothers and their unborn children are harmed from improper health care practices. Global Health Volunteers implemented a program which dramatically decreased maternal mortality rates in targeted communities where we serve in Peru.
  • Wounds and injuries go untreated for lack of basic supplies and training
  • Children and adults fall sick from dirty water and malnutrition.